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It apparently still had all of its contents, including unopened bottles of wine.

It is frequently reported during search and rescue ops, as are the two DC-3s that have been mentioned on your web site." Ken (NAV CANADA retired) Reactions welcome EMAIL (but sure to state the -url- (link) and subject!!!

And here is a 2017 response to the B-17 at Bennett (or Bennet) Lake, also ) in a lake NW of Whitehorse; several groups spent a great deal of time and money searching a lake in the late 1980s and 1990s with no reported results (not that I know of at least). Funny thing though: to date there is absolutely no evidence the USAAF ever lost a B-24 in the Yukon, missing, crashed or otherwise!?! I often wonder if the B-24 story was somehow mixed up with the C-54 at Snag story (about half way down this page): slightly different time frames, both large 4 engine aircraft and Wellesley Lake is very close to the expected flight path of the missing C-54; which was the perfect place to make an emergency landing, on solid lake ice in the middle of a Yukon winter." Reactions welcomed (email - responded Jan.2015: "With reference to a downed B-25 Mitchell bomber near Whitehorse, YT in 1952. We received an alert regarding this plane and I was a spotter, I believe on a Lancaster, for two days. I had a particular interest in the search as the pilot was Robin Hooper, who was a school friend. They were on excercises I believe, from CFB Cold Lake (Alberta) or possibly from CFB Moose Jaw (Saskatchewan). I found some OCR-scanned text, badly mauled, from the Amarillo Tribune (copy of 22Feb1938): "Plying the mail and flying passengers in the bush country.

Watson Lake’s B-26 belongs in a Yukon museum, rather than a museum down south.He had passed over town heading south, but turned back due to the darkness.The Icelandic River was a well know commercial floatplane base at the time.They have ten planes now, carrying from four to 12 passengers on regular schedules, but most of their business is freight. Ted's got back about 0,000 of his 0 already, and the company's took in about ,000. "You know," he said suddenly, "It makes me homesick to think of what's back there.The house and the car, the fellows all around, the bush country with its miners and trappers , Hunyaks, Canucks, breeds, the airplanes coming down on lakes lost from the world.' At Red Lake, they damn near needed a traffic cop last summer.Several years ago, private salvagers pulled a P-39 Airacobra out of Carpenter Lake, NWT, but were stopped by government officials before they reached the US border. After a year of legal wranglings, the Airacobra was successfully transferred to a US-based restoration facility.More than 7.000 US-built planes were flown through the Yukon en route to the Soviet Union during the WW2.Of the aircraft that came down on the BC-Yukon border, all 3 have found their way into the hands of collectors.One has been restored to flight capability and is housed at the 'Fantasy of Flight museum' in Polk, Florida.They all walked to the store and then sent a teamster with a team of horses and a sleigh to pick up the baggage and freight." E. "Well, we didn't even have maps." Finally, his own company started, with a war buddy, Milt Ashton, as general manager and with a fellow pilot [Glenn Morris?some text unreadable], Ted Stull, as vice president in charge of maintenance. A while ago, a sourdough got hold of Ted Stull and said he had a hunch about a place up along the Sachlgo River. To file a claim you've got to make a shot of doing some work on it, so this fellow just goes through the motions because he's not ready to work it yet, runs a diamond drill down any old where and dulls out 0-a-ton ore.

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